A Kid’s Perspective

“Daddy, you’re almost as tall as the ceiling,” said my 5 year old, with the enthusiasm of a scientist who has discovered a new planet.

“No I’m not. See, look,” I said. I reached my arms up to the ceiling so that he could see the gap between the top of my head and the ceiling.

“Yeah, I told ya. You’re really tall,” he replied.

I looked down at him and thought, “He’s right.” I tower over him like a giant.

I’m a larger than average guy, but by no means a behemoth. However, that small exchange between us took me back 25 years and reminded me what it is like to physically look through the eyes of a child. Adulthood dulls the senses and bastardizes our imaginations, but it just takes a jog through memory lane to bring them alive again.

I remember the first time I saw a cow up close. I think I was 3. I thought it was the most gigantic thing I had ever seen–100 feet tall with a nose as wide as a barn door! I looked up at this monster, terrified that it was going to step across the fence and trample me down with its tree trunk legs. The more I think of it, the more memories flood in–A fireworks display as loud as a war zone, a hilly car ride that felt like a roller coaster, or a dog that I swore was the devil.

So what is it worth–giving a kid’s perspective a second thought? For me the conversation between me and my son forced me to consider that maybe I haven’t always been as sensitive to him as I should be. Things that are commonplace to adults can be overwhelming or downright terrifying to a child. It makes me remember the times my dad was there to comfort me when I was afraid and instills the hope that my boys find the same comfort in me.

My son is just now brave enough to attempt using the automatic dryers in restrooms, and I know that I have not always so kind to him when he has refused to use them out of fear. I’m working on it, and I encourage you to put your kid glasses on  every now and then and gain a little perspective.

 

Comments

The Beginning
About Jared Tullos

Husband and Father to 3. Doodler, Tinkerer, Stinkerer. Regional Standout in Staying Alive the Goodest.

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Comments

  1. @knowingdad says:

    Great piece. I guess we’re always learning and our kids will often be the one’s who ground us the most. Now, I’m off to have breakfast (with my “kid glasses” on, this could get messy…)

    • “…our kids will often be the one’s who ground us the most.” You said it. I’m brought back to earth daily by my son’s thought process. It astounds me sometimes how logical he is, then I remember that a child’s speech is often free of ulterior motives and nuance.

  2. James Hudyma says:

    “Kid Glasses” I really like that. I remember thinking it was so cool when I grew taller than my dad because for many years he seemed so big.

    • I thought it would take me forever to get as tall as my dad. Now I’m about 3 inches taller than he is! His personality is much bigger than his physical stature, though.

  3. My now 5yo would freak out about both the automatic dryers and flushing toilets in public restrooms as recently as 6mos ago. It was always unpleasant and I definitely could have used some of this perspective as I was probably a little too impatient with him about this.

    Nice piece.

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