State of Social Part II – Community

Good to see you again! So yesterday’s post, State of Social, Part I – Coming Back After a Year and a Half, sounded a little like a rant and a lot like desperate plea for followers on Twitter. If you haven’t read it yet, stop now and go take a look so you know what I’m talking about. I’ll wait right here.

Let’s move on.

I did a few things intentionally in that post. For starters, I talked yesterday as I would have in a personal conversation with you. I spoke about my job—at least the credentialing part—but I also downplayed my importance in the grand scheme of the world. Expertise without cockiness—builds trust that I’m not trying to demean you, but that I do know what I’m talking about. I talked about my family and how I do my best to ensure that I spend time with them. Family men are always held on a higher plain, after all. Then I injected some strong statements about social media and many of the self-described experts in the field. This doesn’t apply to all of them. I have a Twitter list I’m re-building you can take a look at of subject matter experts in the field who excel at virtually everything in social. They know their crap! In theory, all of these techniques should work perfectly.

State of Social Part II - Community - Dads Round Table

The force is strong in this one…

That said, we live in an imperfect world. Monetizing everything we do that works well is the norm and it leaves many of us behind. We either don’t have the money to pay for seminars and e-courses on marketing and social media management. Some of simply don’t have the time to devote to becoming social experts. Some of us are just learning and wanted to blog because we can, and it is a staple in social media. Of course, many of us believe that we can make a lot of money and get tons of free swag with little effort. Just like the supplement industry, many social experts play off our emotional brain and lead us to believe that everyone can do it, it just requires paying for the newest product or breakthrough technique.

None of that is what yesterday’s post was for (plus, let’s face it, the “copy” sucked), nor is any of that what this site is for. We, simply stated, want to be a community of parents and writers who have our opinions and want to talk about what’s going on in the world and how it affects us. Along the way, we do want to provide helpful resources, be it how to cure toenail issues (you wouldn’t believe the amount of crap I caught for this post) or how to build a backyard horseshoe pit. We also want to provide you with some entertainment. We are friends with some amazing artists who are developing drawing classes for you, draw for fun, or need creative release. Several of us also write fiction. We’ve dedicated an entire section to short fiction stories for your enjoyment.

See, it’s all about the community.

Just like in your physical neighborhood, we have a wide and varied group of people, services, and expertise—teachers (more teachers and even more teachers), photograph/video production specialists, and many more. We all came together to share our stories and provide you with a place to “Gather, Learn and Be Heard.” We aren’t trying to be the next Huffington Post or Time Magazine, but we do want you to enjoy our various opinions on matters that affect us all. We want you to comment on and share our stories with your other friends. We want you to use us as a conversation starter. We want you to be actively social and grow your (and our) community.

Let’s take back social together!

Seems like communities are slowly becoming a thing of the past. I can’t tell you the last time I saw a block party. Neighbors don’t grill out with each other like they used to. Hell, I can remember when folks could just walk in my parents’ door and yell hello on their way in. Now, it seems like my door stays locked more than unlocked. It’s a shame. Social media and the web is now “the place” to interact. And like I said yesterday, when our feed becomes nothing but ads and self-service, where are we to go next?

Block Party Image - State of Social Part II - Community - Dads Round Table

Block Partyyyyyyy! Whooo!

In fact, if you would like to be an even bigger part of our community and contribute, you will not find a better, lower barrier-to-entry site to express yourself. Becoming a contributor to the site is not only pain-free, but fun and exciting. Plus, if it’s traffic you are looking for, we can offer a base readership of about 30,000 views per month. It isn’t huge, but that’s 3 ½ times as much as I ever got with one of my old personal blogs. Strength in numbers, my friend. And with you included? Who knows how far we could go. If you don’t write, that’s ok too! We have a sweet little Facebook page, Twitter account, and even a Pinterest page if you prefer. Like, pin, and retweet away—whatever you enjoy most.

Can you say you are a part of any other community like that?

Ok, so I have one more post in me about social topics before I move on to some other topics. Come back tomorrow. I want to talk about interaction outside of social media—the ultimate goal for many marketers, especially for email campaigns. They are tough and uncomfortable to say the least, especially if you don’t like hard-selling to people—but more on that tomorrow.

Before you leave…

Take a moment to share this, will you? I would appreciate it. Also, let’s talk below. Like Facebook? You can use the Facebook comments or stay internal to the site just below that. Stay awesome!

Concert Photo credit: N06/8932721200/”>MichaelTapp / Foter / CC BY-NCJedi Photo credit: Brad Montgomery / Foter / CC BYFeatured Image Photo credit: jonathanpercy / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

Comments

The Beginning
About Brandon P. Duncan

Brandon is a dad, husband, US Soldier, and co-founder of Dads Round Table.
When not knee-deep in one of those things, he can often be found tinkering with a woodworking project, writing, drawing, or Photoshopping something... or napping... or he's hurt himself again... or... something...

What Kids Think About Gay Marriage…

I will be honest, I was initially worried about … [Read Article]

The Explicit T-Shirt…

Parents have a lot to worry about these days — … [Read Article]

What I Want My Kids to Know about…

My four-year-old asked me the other day why there … [Read Article]

This is what I think...

*